Flavourart

About Flavors
We have the pleasure to inform you about flavors

Natural and artificial flavors are defined for the consumer in the Code of Federal Regulations. A key line from this definition is the following: " a natural flavor is the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional." Synthetic flavors are those that are made from components that do not meet this definition.
The question at hand, however, appears to be less a matter of legal definition than the "real" or practical difference between these two types of flavorings.
There is little substantive difference in the chemical compositions of natural and artificial flavorings. They are both made in a laboratory by a trained professional, a "flavorist," who blends appropriate chemicals together in the right proportions. The flavorist uses "natural" chemicals to make natural flavorings and "synthetic" chemicals to make synthetic flavorings. The flavorist creating synthetic flavoring must use the same chemicals in his formulation as would be used to make a natural flavoring, however. otherwise, the flavoring will not have the desired flavor. The distinction in flavorings--natural versus artificial--comes from the source of these identical chemicals and may be likened to saying that an apple sold in a gas station is artificial and one sold from a fruit stand is natural.
This issue is somewhat confusing to the average consumer in part because of other seeming parallels in the world. One can, for example, make a blue dye out of blueberry extract or synthetic pigments. These dyes are very different in chemical composition yet both yield a blue color. Similarly, consider one shirt made from wool and another from nylon. Both are shirts, but they have very different chemical compositions. This diversity of building blocks is not possible in flavorings--one makes a given flavor only by using specific chemicals. Thus, if a consumer purchases an apple beverage that contains an artificial flavor, she will ingest the same primary chemicals that she would take in if she had chosen a naturally flavored apple beverage and the same chemicals that nature provided during the apple ripening.
When making a flavor, the flavorist always begins by going to the scientific literature and researching what chemicals nature uses to make the desired flavor. He then selects from the list of flavor components found in, say, real apples, generally simplifying nature list to eliminate those chemicals that make little contribution to taste or are not permitted owing to toxicity. (Nature has no restrictions on using toxic chemicals, whereas the flavorist does.) The flavorist then either chooses chemicals that are natural (isolated from nature as described above) or synthetic chemicals (made by people) to make the flavor.
So is there truly a difference between natural and artificial flavorings? Yes. Artificial flavorings are simpler in composition and potentially safer because only safety-tested components are utilized. Another difference between natural and artificial flavorings is cost. The search for "natural" sources of chemicals often requires that a manufacturer go to great lengths to obtain a given chemical. Natural coconut flavorings, for example, depend on a chemical called massoya lactone. Massoya lactone comes from the bark of the Massoya tree, which grows in Malaysia. Collecting this natural chemical kills the tree because harvesters must remove the bark and extract it to obtain the lactone. Furthermore, the process is costly. This pure natural chemical is identical to the version made in an organic chemists laboratory, yet it is much more expensive than the synthetic alternative. Consumers pay a lot for natural flavorings. But these are in fact no better in quality, nor are they safer, than their cost-effective artificial counterparts.

What is Diacetyl?
We noticed an interest to use our flavours in electronic smoking or vaping and some customers rised question about the presence in some formulations of a compound known as Diacetyl.

First, we would like to clarify what diacetyl is. The following info are sourced from IFIC, International Food Information Council.

What is diacetyl and where is it found?

Diacetyl and related compounds produce the buttery odor and flavor of many foods. It occurs as a natural byproduct of fermentation and is found in several dairy products like butter, cheese and milk as well as in bread, coffee, brandy, and rum. It also is manufactured as a component of artificial butter flavoring that is used in butter-flavored microwave popcorn, candy, baked goods and cake mixes. Are there other flavors like diacetyl? Yes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines replacement flavors or flavoring agents as “substances added to impart or help impart a taste or aroma in food.”

There are also flavor enhancers, which are “substances added to supplement, enhance, or modify the original taste and/or aroma of a food, without imparting a characteristic taste or aroma of its own.” Flavors and flavor enhances are considered part of the larger group of food additives which the FDA regulates. This includes determining their safe use in food. Are there any significant health risks in consuming foods containing diacetyl? No. The FDA currently classifies diacetyl as “Generally Recognized as Safe” (GRAS) for consumption.

What about potential health effects of inhaling diacetyl vapors? Concerns about inhalation of diacetyl vapors stem from worker safety issues, not from the general public consuming or smelling foods flavored with diacetyl in the home. Interest in the possible inhalation effects of diacetyl first arose when workers in a microwave popcorn production facility developed breathing problems in the late 1990’s. Since that time, experience with people working in factories around diacetyl and research in animals has suggested that frequent and repeated breathing of high concentrations of diacetyl in the air may be associated with an extremely rare lung condition known as bronchiolitis obliterans.

This condition can cause scarring of the small airways in the lung, which can result in less air exchange in the airways and over time, airway blockage. As with most medical issues, an individual’s medical history and ongoing medical conditions may influence their response to diacetyl, so some individuals may be more sensitive than others to the inhalation effects of diacetyl. In April 2007, the Occupational and Safety Health Administration (OSHA) launched a program to address hazards and control measures associated with factories where butter-flavored microwave popcorn is produced.

The FDA continues to seek additional information to help further clarify any health effects from diacetyl. Is the industry doing anything about the potential health effects to workers? Yes. Because of the potential health risks from repeated exposure, the industry has implemented changes to reduce workplace exposure to diacetyl, including implementing engineering controls such as closed mixing tanks, separate mixing rooms for butter flavors, requiring respirators for mixing room operators, and improving air circulation in facilities.

We realize that for E smokers, our food flavors are used in a different way as they are not ingested but inhaled, and the presence of diacetyl can be a cause of concern.

For this reason we have carried out massive removal of diacetyl from our flavor collection since November 2010 and product still containing it are clearly identified.

Disclaimer: We produce and sell FOOD FLAVORS which comply with Italian and EU legislation and EFSA reccomendation. They are safe for FOOD use as they are intended to enter the body by the digestive system, not by lungs.

Digestion involves acid breakdown, enzyme attack, and kidney and liver processing. Vapor by the lungs goes directly in the blood stream. Even though due to absence of combustion, vaping can be compared to odor smelling in open air, consumption of food flavors by vaping has not been specifically tested for safety. Flavourart srl can not be held responsible for any claim or damage arising by the use of food flavor by the means of electronic devices as E-vapers, E cigarettes and similar.

Meringue Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Meringue Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

Trustpilot   Meringue Flavour Concentrate

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Cream Fresh Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Cream Fresh Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Apple Fuji Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Apple Fuji Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

Trustpilot    Apple Fuji Flavour Concentrate

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Lemon Sicily Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Cookie Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Cookie Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Vienna Cream Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Vienna Cream Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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£3.20

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Caramel Flavour Concentrate Flavourart

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£3.20

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Marshmallow Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Marshmallow Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Forest Fruits Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Forest Fruits Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Lime Tahity Distilled Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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£3.20

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Almond Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Almond Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Blackcurrant Flavour Concentrate Flavourart

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£3.20

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Custard Pi 3.14 - A Variation Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Coconut Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Coconut Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Strawberry Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Strawberry Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

Trustpilot   Strawberry Flavour Concentrate

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Lime Cold Pressed Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Lime Cold Pressed Flavour Concentrate (close to or past best before date)

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£0.50

Trustpilot   Lime Cold Pressed Flavour Concentrate

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Liquid Amber Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Liquid Amber Flavour Concentrate (close to or past best before date)

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£0.50

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Apple Pie Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Apple Pie Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

Trustpilot    Apple Pie Flavour Concentrate

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Joy (Biscuit Meringue and Caramel) Flavour Concentrate 10ml Flavourart
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Trustpilot   Biscuit Meringue and Caramel Flavour Concentrate 10ml

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Vanilla Bourbon Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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Vanilla Bourbon Flavour Concentrate

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£3.20

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Torrone Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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£3.20

Trustpilot   Torrone Flavour Concentrate

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Pear Flavour Concentrate Flavourart

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MTS Vape Wizard Flavour Concentrate Flavourart
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£3.20

Trustpilot   MTS Vape Wizard Flavour Concentrate

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